In this Aug. 5, 2010 photo, a pharmacy tech poses for a picture with tablets of hydrocodone at the Oklahoma Hospital Discount Pharmacy that was robbed in July in Edmond, Okla. Across the country, pharmacy robberies are on the rise, partly because of the increasing demand for prescription drugs, according to law enforcement officers and industry officials. Prescription painkillers rank second behind marijuana as the country's most common illegal drug problem, according to the Office of National Drug Control Policy.

Less than a couple months after Nick Curtin opened a pharmacy in suburban Tulsa in 2008, the store was burglarized twice in one week. And just last year a masked man robbed him at gunpoint, making off with 1,800 pills.

Curtin admits it could easily happen again and there's not much he can do to stop it.

"It's one of those things; there's only so many things you can do," he said.

Across the country, pharmacy robberies are on the rise, partly because of the increasing demand for prescription drugs, according to law enforcement officers and industry officials. Prescription painkillers rank second behind marijuana as the country's most common illegal drug problem, according to the Office of National Drug Control Policy.


This photo taken Aug. 5, 2010 shows dottles of drugs commonly targeted by thieves at Hospital Discount Pharmacy that was robbed in July in Edmond, Okla. Across the country, pharmacy robberies are on the rise, partly because of the increasing demand for prescription drugs, according to law enforcement officers and industry officials. Prescription painkillers rank second behind marijuana as the country's most common illegal drug problem, according to the Office of National Drug Control Policy.

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