Many Millennials grew up hearing that they should study what they love. While that's a nice sentiment, it's also landed countless recent grads in quagmires of student debt and unemployment. In today's tough economic climate, some college majors simply offer better prospects than others—and savvy students should want to know the difference. That's why we came up with our list of the ten best college majors for your career. We analyzed the unemployment rates and salaries for graduates of the 100 most popular college majors, using data from Georgetown University's Center on Education and the Workforce and Payscale.com. What did we look for? Fields of study with grads—both recent grads within the past five years and those well into their careers—who enjoy an attractive combination of big paychecks and abundant employment opportunities. The undergraduate programs that we ranked can take from two to five years to complete. Take a peek at our list of the ten best college majors for your career. 1. Pharmacy and Pharmacology Unemployment rate: 3.2% Unemployment rate for recent grads: 5.4% Median salary: $105,000 Median salary for recent grads: $51,200 Projected job growth for this field, 2010–2020: 25% A pharmacy major can be a bit of an investment, since most states require students to earn a post-grad degree to work as a pharmacist. However, pharmacologists, who don’t necessarily require graduate training, can land jobs right out of college. Public and private labs hire recent grads to research drugs and drug interactions. But whether pharmacy undergrads go on to med school, research or some related field, they can expect to earn big salaries fast. Pharmacists stand to make six figures working in hospitals and stores. Both programs involve pharmacology, toxicology and ethics classes—and promise plenty of jobs when class lets out. Even among recent grads, unemployment is a low 5.4%. 2. Nursing Unemployment rate: 2.2% Unemployment rate for recent grads: 4.0% Median salary: $60,000 Median salary for recent grads: $48,000 Projected job growth for this field, 2010–2020: 26% Nursing has always made for a steady, well-paid career, but it's looking especially good as baby-boomers age. Demand for nurses is way up, so unemployment, even among new grads, is down. Nursing majors study a predictable list of health care subjects including anatomy, physiology and biology. While you can score an R.N. certification after two years, nurses with bachelor's degrees generally enjoy better salaries, earning potential and advancement opportunities than their less-educated peers. 3. Transportation Sciences and Technology 4. Treatment Therapy Professions 5. Chemical Engineering 6. Electrical Engineering 7. Medical Technologies 8. Construction Services 9. Management Information Systems 10. Medical Assisting Services Read entire article at:  Yahoo Finance